gr8writingtips:

it’s a metaphor; you put your fingers on the keys but you don’t actually do any writing

1,210 notes
posted 18 hours ago (® gr8writingtips)

itreallyatemyhand:

real-faker:

virginmarx:

zebablah:

television history

i’ve been trying to explain this sketch to people for years

there is literally no way to explain this sketch it’s just a thing you have to see and even then I’m not sure why it’s so funny

to be honest i have no idea if dear sister is funnier knowing the context or not but here’s the context anyway

222,898 notes
posted 20 hours ago (® stupidfuckingquestions)

sailorsenshiharuka:

what if age of ultron is like introducing wanda and pietro and it’s like

"the maximoff twins are mu[cut to another scene]"

and then later there’s a fighting and someone goes

"oh god she’s a m[LOUD EXPLOSIONS]"

and then in the aftermath someone’s like

"so you guys are [CAR HORN]ts huh?"

and it just keeps going through the whole movie

8,499 notes
posted 20 hours ago (® sailorsenshiharuka)

The “Everybody is done with everybody” Wedding

24,022 notes
posted 2 days ago (® robbsthark)

If you always take it on the chin and wear it
Nothing will change.

1,499 notes
posted 2 days ago (® broadwill)
It really worries me that 84% of this audience agrees with that statement, because the kind of people that say “political correctness gone mad” are usually using that phrase as a kind of cover action to attack minorities or people that they disagree with. I’m of an age that I can see what a difference political correctness has made. When I was four years old, my grandfather drove me around Birmingham, where the Tories had just fought an election campaign saying, “if you want a nigger for a neighbour, vote Labour,” and he drove me around saying, “this is where all the niggers and the coons and the jungle bunnies live.” And I remember being at school in the early 80s and my teacher, when he read the register, instead of saying the name of the one asian boy in the class, he would say, “is the black spot in,” right? And all these things have gradually been eroded by political correctness, which seems to me to be about an institutionalised politeness at its worst. And if there is some fallout from this, which means that someone in an office might get in trouble one day for saying something that someone was a bit unsure about because they couldn’t decide whether it was sexist or homophobic or racist, it’s a small price to pay for the massive benefits and improvements in the quality of life for millions of people that political correctness has made. It’s a complete lie that allows the right, which basically controls media now, and international politics, to make people on the left who are concerned about the way people are represented look like killjoys. And I’m sick, I’m really sick— 84% of you in this room that have agreed with this phrase, you’re like those people who turn around and go, “you know who the most oppressed minorities in Britain are? White, middle-class men.” You’re a bunch of idiots.
- Stewart Lee - “Heresy”, BBC Radio 4, 16th May 2007 (via ijclark)
822 notes
posted 2 days ago (® ijclark)

Zrinka Cvitesic poses for pictures after winning Best Actress in Musical during the Lawrence Olivier Awards for theatre at the Royal Opera House in central London on April 13, 2014.

216 notes
posted 4 days ago (® rory-williams)

robbstark:

yeah the purple wedding is nice and all, fun for all the family, etc

BUT ARE YOU READY FOR THEON FINDING OUT ABOUT ROBB?

image

215 notes
posted 4 days ago (® robbstark)
When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.
44,806 notes
posted 4 days ago (® rexilla)

dangerhamster:

Rubeus Remus Potter. You were named after the only two people at Hogwarts who seemed to give shit about me, because come on who else would I name you after? A verbally abusive dickbag who was in love with my mum and gave me shit all my life and someone who convinced a bunch of children that they needed to be soldiers? What kind of awful aspirations would that make you end up having? Come on son I’m not an idiot…

27,653 notes
posted 4 days ago (® dangerhamster)

elsiesnuffin:

Clint Barton is lying, bruised and bloodied, on the floor of a sparse yet expensive looking studio apartment.

His head is pounding, something that is not helped by that music. Is that his phone? Yeah, it’s his phone.

With a groan he opens his eyes.

Looking down at him from the sofa is a girl in a purple sweater and a mangy looking yellow lab.

"Someone named Natasha keeps calling," the girl explains as she hands the phone down to him. "And texting."

Clint takes the phone. Fifty two missed calls. Futz.

"Ok," he mutters. "This looks bad."

2,376 notes
posted 5 days ago (® elsiesnuffin)

Mickey Milkovich (rivetingly played by Noel Fisher) first made his mark in an unexpected Season 1 sexual encounter with teenage Gallagher son Ian (Cameron Monaghan). Ian, established as gay early in the series, receives tacit support from the handful of family members and friends to whom he comes out. Mickey, by contrast, is a profoundly closeted neighborhood thug: a belligerent, grubby kid with the words “FUCK U-UP” tattooed on his knuckles … who also happens to be an exuberant bottom. However, instead of writing off this hook-up as another one-time moment of comedic outrageousness, Shameless has made Mickey’s arc a surprisingly sensitive one, examining the impact of poverty and family violence on the character’s life.

Mickey has been raised in a household ruled by terror. The Milkovich brood is overseen by tyrannical father Terry, who is often out of sight (thanks to frequent incarceration), but never far out of mind. Mickey’s appearance is disheveled: at times visibly dirty. His speech is littered with wisecracks and put-downs. He’s cagey and mean and picks fights. All of these at-once repugnant qualities are undercut by viewers’ slow, sobering realization: This is how an abused child survives. Because, as we discover in both subtle clues and scenes of explicit brutality, Terry’s hairpin trigger rage is calibrated to fire at any mention of homosexuality.

… In tiny increments since his first encounter with Ian, and at clear risk to his own safety, Mickey has pushed himself further and further past his fear. We are reminded of the time Mickey, returning from a stint in juvenile detention, greeted Ian with a deceptively terse, “Missed ya.” Of Mickey and Ian’s first kiss, hurried and nervous, long after they began meeting for sex. Of the futile, single-word plea – “Don’t” – when Ian told him he was enlisting in the Army. Of Mickey’s hesitant response to a stranger who asked, of his relationship with Ian, “Did you guys just meet last night, or are you together?”

Finally, after a pause: “Together.”

This, all of this, is what coming out looks like. And this is what Mickey Milkovich’s relevance truly hinges on: not only an acknowledgment of the suffering and self-denial that is still a reality in the lives of many LGBTQ people; but the validation that coming out is not irrelevant or passé or an all-or-nothing game. No matter how small and unwhole these acts of disclosure may seem, they are still brave.

5,372 notes
posted 1 week ago (® thetracyproject)

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